Posts for: January, 2013

By Fennell Baron & Associates
January 24, 2013
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   root planing  
RootPlaningtotheRescue

What does it mean when your dental hygienist recommends root planing? To put it simply, root planing is a method of cleaning the roots of your teeth in order to avoid periodontal (“peri” – around, “odont” – tooth) disease.

Periodontal disease happens when dental plaque, a biofilm of bacteria, is not regularly removed and begins to build up on teeth near the gum line. The bacteria cause inflammation, and this in turn causes the gum tissue to detach from the teeth. The widening spaces between the gum tissue and the teeth, called pockets, are environments in which bacteria can continue to collect and cause further inflammation and infection. Ultimately, this can lead to infection, bone loss, and loss of teeth.

Root planing is a technique designed to avoid such dire results. The bacteria, along with products they manufacture as part of their metabolism, can become ingrained in the surfaces of the tooth's root (the part of the tooth that is below the enamel). These bacterial products will form hard deposits called tartar or calculus.

Deep Cleaning Your Teeth
Of course, the best idea is to brush and floss away the plaque before the bacteria begin to build up on your teeth. If this is not done and pockets begin to form, the bacteria and toxic products are more difficult to remove in order to deep clean your teeth.

The first step is scaling. My hygienist or I will remove superficial collections of calculus. If material still remains within deep pockets, root planing is the next step. It involves actually planing the surface of the root, smoothing the surface free of calculus, bacteria, and toxins that have ingrained into the root surfaces.

Root planing is most often done under local anesthesia so that you remain comfortable while the cleaning procedures are done. The initial cleaning may be done by an ultrasonic instrument that vibrates particles off the root surfaces and flushes the pockets with water. Small hand instruments called curettes are used to finish the process. Antibacterial medication may then be used to help clear away infection from the pockets. Sometimes you may experience some tooth sensitivity to hot and cold after the root planing. If needed, this can be treated by applying fluoride to the root surfaces.

Depending on the extent of your gum disease, it may not be possible to remove all the deposits at one appointment, and it may be necessary to have multiple appointments over a few weeks to remove the remaining deposits. Often after three to four weeks the inflamed tissues have healed, leaving you with healthy gums once again.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about dental hygiene and root planing. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Planing.”


By Fennell Baron & Associates
January 15, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
Top5AdvantagesofDentalImplants

There's a lot to like about dental implants, today's state-of-the-art tooth-replacement system. We consider them the best choice for replacing missing teeth because implants are:

Healthy
You may not realize this, but when a tooth is missing, the bone underneath it begins to melt away. That's because bone needs constant stimulation to rebuild itself and stay healthy, and it receives this stimulation from teeth. It's a delicate balance that's disrupted by the loss of even one tooth. Because implants are made of biocompatible titanium, they actually fuse to the bone and prevent bone loss.

Strong
The fusion of implant to bone is an extremely solid connection. Not only does it offer a strong replacement for a missing tooth, but it can also offer support to other tooth-replacement methods such as fixed bridges or dentures. By themselves, these other methods would not preserve bone and might even hasten its loss in the case of dentures. But with implants, bone-loss is prevented — as is embarrassing and uncomfortable slippage of dentures.

Aesthetically Pleasing
When you receive your implant, it is left alone for a few months to complete the fusion process described above. Then it is topped with a crown made of a realistic tooth-like material. The result is so convincing as a tooth replacement, only you and your dentist may be able to tell it's not a natural tooth.

Long-Lasting
Dental implants have an amazing success rate — over 97%. And once they fuse to the jawbone, they should never need replacement. In fact, they will likely outlast the crowns to which they are attached, but this is not a problem. Implant crowns are precision components that detach for easy replacement, should the need arise.

Economical
Implants have a higher initial cost than other forms of tooth replacement, but when you consider how long they last, they are very economical. Consider it an investment in your health, appearance and self-confidence.

If you have any questions about dental implants, contact us today to schedule an appointment for an implant consultation.

You can read more about this topic in the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”


By Fennell Baron & Associates
January 07, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene   tooth decay   x-rays  
AreDentalX-raysReallySafe

Yes, dental x-rays are a safe and vital tool we use for measuring and monitoring your oral health. We feel it is imperative to ensure that our patients have the facts — especially when it comes to their oral healthcare. This is why we want to respond to this important question about the safety of dental x-rays.

We want you to know what they are, how they are used, what makes them a safe and effective tool, and why they are so important to dentistry and your health. X-rays are a form of electromagnetic radiation, in fact, just like natural daylight, except they have a much shorter wavelength. And because they are a form of ionizing radiation, they can easily penetrate bodily tissues without causing any harm when used properly. The reasons we use them are obvious; they help us literally see what is unseen. For example, they enable us to see bone structure and roots of teeth among other things, and are commonly used for diagnosing tooth decay. Furthermore, today's x-ray machines and other image capturing techniques are so sophisticated and sensitive that the amount of radiation required for diagnosis is almost nothing when compared to what you get from the background radiation present in everyday living. In fact, the average single digital periapical (“peri” – around; “apical” – root end of a tooth) film is equal to 1/10 the amount of everyday natural environmental exposure. These facts make it clear that dental x-rays are completely safe and, thus, are nothing you need to be concerned about.

Learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “X-ray Frequency And Safety.” If you need to schedule an appointment, contact us today.


By Fennell Baron & Associates
January 05, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
AreTooth-ColoredFillingsRightforYou

When you say “ahhhhh,” are you worried about all your unsightly metal fillings? If so, did you know that your dentist can resolve your concerns through the use of tooth-colored fillings?

The public's demand for aesthetic tooth-colored (metal free) restorations (fillings) together with the dental profession's desire to preserve as much natural tooth structure as possible has led to the development of special adhesive tooth-colored restorations. And the demand is not limited to just the front teeth. In fact, many people are opting to replace all of their metal fillings — not just those in the front teeth — so that all of their teeth appear younger, fresher and as if they have never had any cavities.

Can you really mimic natural teeth? Proper tooth restoration is a lot more than just filling holes. It is a unique art applied with scientific understanding. Each tooth's internal shape and structure is the guide to how it must be rebuilt to successfully restore it. However, choosing which material to use to restore or rebuild teeth is a critical one based on scientific understanding, experience and clinical judgment — expertise we use daily in our office. The most popular options include composite resins and porcelains, as they allow us to mimic natural tooth colors and shapes. But for the most life-like, natural tooth-colored filling, your best option is porcelain. Porcelain, which is built up in layers, can be made to mimic the natural translucency and contours of tooth enamel.

But what about matching the color? Will it really match? Absolutely! Whether we use resins or porcelain, through our artistry we will create absolute tooth-like replicas. You will never know your teeth have fillings! And unlike metal alloys, these newer materials bond directly to the remaining enamel and dentin of which the teeth themselves are made, thus stabilizing and strengthening them. These techniques are even suitable for children's teeth and can incorporate fluoride to reduce decay.

Still undecided? If so, we understand. Feel free to contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth-colored restorations. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth-Colored Fillings.”




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Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH

(513) 631-6600
5451 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45212-1708