Posts for: February, 2011

By Fennell Baron & Associates
February 27, 2011
Category: Oral Health

Snoring and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a condition that occurs when the upper airway (back of your throat) collapses or is blocked, causing significant airflow disruption. A person with OSA continues snoring at a regular rate but is interrupted by long silent periods during which there is no breathing for atleast 10 seconds or more. Believe it or not, this issue affects millions of people worldwide. It can leave you feeling tired, depressed, irritable, as well as cause memory loss and poor concentration. And if you have OSA that is left undiagnosed and untreated you could fall victim to heart attacks, strokes, irregular heartbeat, high blood pressure, heart disease and even impotence. For these reasons, we feel it is important that you understand the real-world consequences that can occur if you ignore your OSA.

Reality is that most people are unaware that their dentist can be an excellent resource in helping to diagnose and treat OSA. However the first and most important step is to receive a proper, thorough examination and diagnosis with an appropriately trained physician and dentist. If after completing this process you are diagnosed with OSA, we will discuss treatment options. Some of these may include:

  • Suggesting that you exercise and lose weight if you are overweight.
  • Sleeping with a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine that provides pressurized air into your airways through a mask that covers both your nose and mouth while sleeping.
  • Sleeping with a professionally made oral appliance or mouthguard that can reposition your lower jaw, tongue, soft palate and uvula (the dangling tissue in the top, back portion of your mouth) into a better position during sleep to relieve blockage.

If you are ready to discuss you questions and concerns about your snoring, or the snoring habits of another family member, contact us today to schedule a consultation. You can also learn more about the signs, symptoms, and treatment options when you read “Snoring & Sleep Apnea.”


By Fennell Baron & Associates
February 20, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

Are you are considering a cosmetic procedure such as porcelain veneers? To assist you in making this decision, we developed the following list of questions you should consider asking before getting porcelain veneers.

  • Am I a good candidate for porcelain veneers?
  • Can you show me examples of your work?
  • How much will my veneers cost?
  • Will my insurance cover any portion of my procedure?
  • Do you offer any financing for my procedure or can you make any recommendations for financing?
  • Can you create a computer-generated image or mock-up of what my new smile will look like?
  • How will you chose what color to make my veneers?
  • How long will it take from my initial consultation until I receive my final, permanent veneers?
  • How much tooth reduction (drilling) will you need to do before placing my veneers?
  • How do veneers attach to my teeth?
  • Can you create a prototype or temporary veneers so that I can “test drive” my new smile before my permanent ones are made?
  • What do I need to do to clean and protect my veneers?
  • How long can I expect my veneers to last?
  • If at some point in the future I decide I want my veneers removed, what can I expect?

We hope that the above questions help you obtain all the answers you need as you consider getting porcelain veneers. If you have other questions, concerns, or if you are ready to take the next step and schedule a consultation, please contact our office.


By Fennell Baron & Associates
February 13, 2011
Category: Oral Health

Planning a dream trip is something many people spend weeks, months or even years doing prior to their departure. However, in all of their excitement, they often forget about preparing for any “what if” dental emergencies that could occur while on the road. This is especially important if the trip will be overseas where you could face language barriers in addition to the concerns of finding qualified dental professionals you feel comfortable with treating an emergency.

The first and most important step you can take prior to departure is a proactive one: schedule an appointment with us for a thorough exam. (You should also do the same and schedule an appointment with your physician concerning your general health.) During this visit, be sure to let us know about your travel plans, where you will be going and what you will be doing so that we can ensure you are best prepared for your trip. For example, if you will be trying some new or high-impact activities, you may need a mouthguard to protect your teeth. Also, have any dental problems taken care of prior to traveling because pressure changes, especially during air travel, can cause pain in an untreated tooth.

As for seeking safe emergency dental care while you're traveling, here are some tips:

  • Be sure to carry your travel information with you at all times, including the names and phone numbers of organizations to contact in case of a dental or medical emergency.
  • Some good sources to contact in an emergency are:
    • Friends or relatives that you are visiting in the area
    • A local hotel concierge
    • If traveling overseas, Americans living in the area or American military personnel; The International Association For Medical Assistance To Travelers, a network of doctors and medical institutions around the world (www.iamat.org; 716-754-4883); American Consulate or American Embassy in the country you are visiting; or if in Europe, the American Dental Society of Europe (ADSE; www.adse.co.uk; Phone: 011 44 141 331 0088)

And be sure to take our address with you on your trip. We would love to receive a postcard from you while you're traveling!


By Fennel Baron & Associates
February 08, 2011
Category: Dental Procedures

Before determining if a bridge or an implant will work best for you, here is some useful background information. There are two main parts to a tooth; the crown or part that you see above the gum line and the root portion that is below the gum line and encased in bone — the part that is replaced by a dental implant.

A dental implant is inserted into the jawbone during a surgical procedure. The implant is actually a titanium screw-like device that is placed in contact with the bone. During a 3 to 6 month healing period, it subsequently fuses to the bone. A crown made from dental porcelain, gold or a combination of both is then attached to the implant to mimic a healthy, normal tooth.

There are two critical reasons why implants are the preferred method for permanently replacing an adult tooth. The first is that they are less susceptible to gum disease and they are not subject to tooth decay. The second is that because they attach to the jawbone and not to the adjacent teeth. And while an implant may cost a little more initially, when compared to the longevity and replacement cost of bridgework over a lifetime, they may cost less.

By contrast, a fixed bridge is also a non-removable restoration or prosthesis (replacement part) that is held in place by attaching it to your natural adjacent teeth. The treatment gets its name from the French word for bridge, “pont,” as the tooth being replaced is called a pontic. Before placing a bridge, the teeth on either side of the missing tooth must be prepared by removing layers of tooth enamel. Three new teeth are then crafted as a single unit from dental porcelain and/or precious metals with crowns on either side of the pontic. The pontic is held in place when the crowns are placed. Bridgework is at risk for gum disease and tooth decay and requires careful maintenance.

As with most dental procedures you have options and choices. Luckily, when it comes to determining whether a bridge or an implant will work best for you, you can rely upon our expertise. However, by having a clear understanding of these two options you are now better prepared for working with us should you require this treatment option. To learn more read the article, “Implants Vs. Bridgework.” Or, contact usto discuss your questions or to schedule an appointment.


By Fennel Baron & Associates
February 08, 2011
Category: Oral Health

In today's fast-paced society, nearly everyone is looking for reliable solutions to resolve problems almost instantly. Unfortunately, in many situations, bad breath cannot be cured that quickly. This is why we want to provide you with the following rules of thumb for treating your bad breath.

  • Use a soft-bristled brush and a proper technique to clean your teeth at least twice a day, in the morning when you wake and before you go to bed.
  • Floss your teeth at least once daily to remove the bacterial plaque and food particles between your teeth, as these are two known causes of bad breath and tooth decay.
  • Clean your tongue, as it can often be the main culprit with too many odor-producing bacteria living on its surface. To clean your tongue, use a tongue scraper obtainable from a local drug or discount store, or brush your tongue with your toothbrush. Remember, a healthy tongue should be pink in color and not have a yellowish or brownish coating.
  • Chew a sugar-free gum that contains xylitol, a natural, sugar-free sweetener that actually has been shown to help prevent caries (cavities) while improving your breath.
  • Change your eating and drinking habits. Drinking plenty of tap water will not only keep your mouth hydrated (a dry mouth is another cause of bad breath), but it also can help prevent caries if you live in an area with fluoridated water. And by adding plenty of crunchy fruits and veggies such as carrots, celery and apples, you stimulate the production of saliva; thus keeping your mouth moist and rinsed out.

And last but not least, you can contact us today to schedule a consultation for an examination, cleaning and treatment plan. Or, you can learn more when you read the Dear Doctor article, “Bad Breath — More Than Just Embarrassing.”




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Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH

(513) 631-6600
5451 Montgomery Rd Cincinnati, OH 45212-1708